Tuesday, January 22News That Matters

Public Health & Policy

Public Health & Policy

Youth Nutrition Education Programs Making a Difference

Youth Nutrition Education Programs Making a Difference

Public Health & Policy
Getting kids to eat right and think about healthy foods are critical to improving quality of life and reducing risk of disease for future generations. Here are a few notable organizations focusing on children’s nutrition education. Edible Schoolyard NYC ( https://www.edibleschoolyardnyc.org) ·      What they do: Edible Schoolyard NYC teaches garden and kitchen classes to New York City public school students. Their vision is that all children will be educated and empowered to make healthy food choices for themselves, their communities, and their environment, actively achieving a just and sustainable food system for all. ·      Their mission: “Edible Schoolyard NYC partners with public schools to transform the hearts, minds, and eating
Organizations Improving Access to Healthy, Fair, Affordable Food

Organizations Improving Access to Healthy, Fair, Affordable Food

Public Health & Policy
There are so many organizations working to help make a better, more interesting food system that, over the next few months I’m going to provide information about some of those organizations. The following are organizations that improve access to healthy, fair and affordable food. Ceres Community Project (ceresproject.org) What they do: The Ceres Community Project seeks to strengthen the community by sharing healthy, organic food. The project provides fresh, organic, home-delivered meals to low-income individuals who are too sick to shop and cook – all prepared by youth volunteers in a “soil to community” food system education program, nutrition classes, cookbook, catering services and a café with the aim of educating the public on eating right. Five thousand pounds of the
Interview with Dr. Marion Nestle, Food Policy Guru

Interview with Dr. Marion Nestle, Food Policy Guru

Public Health & Policy
To say that Marion Nestle is simply a professor at New York University would be a tremendous understatement When it comes to #food policy and public #health advocacy Dr. Nestle is a guru.  She fearlessly and relentlessly pushes food companies and policy makers to think and care about the consumer. She has moxy (just listen to any of her lectures or talks). I was fortunate enough to do an email #interview with her to discuss her thoughts about food and talk about the subject of her new book,  Soda Politics: Taking on Big Soda (and Winning) ( Oxford University Press, 2015). Diet Detective: Dr. Nestle, thanks for the opportunity to interview you. My first question is about you.  What is your relationship to food and nutrition; what drove
NYC Mandatory Salt Warnings

NYC Mandatory Salt Warnings

Public Health & Policy
From NPR…”The Center for Science in the Public Interest, a consumer watchdog group in Washington, D.C., has identified other meals that can be real #sodium bombs, too. For instance, at Red Lobster, diners have the option of creating a combo meal of fried shrimp, french fries, a cheese biscuit, pasta and Caesar salad that has more than 6,000 mg of sodium. That’s about three days’ worth of sodium. #New York City is the first city in the U.S. to require a sodium warning. The rule applies to #restaurants with 15 locations anywhere in the U.S. — not just in the city. Restaurants will have until March 1 to comply. After that, they can be fined.” Read more here>>>   You can also read this column about so
Prof. Talks Menu Labeling – Better Alternatives?

Prof. Talks Menu Labeling – Better Alternatives?

Public Health & Policy
This was in the NY Times, written by Aaron E. Carroll, a professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine. He blogs on health research and policy at The Incidental Economist. “Policy makers continue to believe that the problem is people’s lack of knowledge that they are wolfing down calorie-rich foods. It is assumed that once Americans know what they are eating, they will eat less, or at least with health in mind. For this reason, many health advocates have called for restaurants to provide people with calorie counts of what they are ordering. Recent mandates mean that by the end of next year, calorie labeling will be required on all menus in chain restaurants and establishments selling food in the United States&#
Body Teasing Impacts Young Girls' Health

Body Teasing Impacts Young Girls' Health

Public Health & Policy
Current research about childhood obesity has illustrated the complexity of the epidemic–how it intertwines with hunger, poverty, food deserts and socioeconomic status. A new University of Houston study examined a practice that may seem like a harmless playground antic, but could have long-lasting and harmful effects to a young girl’s perception of herself and of food. Professor Norma Olvera, #health educator with the UH College of Education, examined the impact of teasing on minority, adolescent girls, specifically as predictors of disordered eating behaviors. Olvera said there are two reasons to pursue this kind of research. “First because Hispanic and African-American girls are at a higher risk of obesity, which may...

Can I Drink the Water?

Public Health & Policy
#Water used to be simple. It came out of a tap; you drank it; and it was good. Now, with concerns about safety and taste, water is much more complicated. After contacting the experts and scouring the research, here are the answers to the most important water questions. Where do we get our #tap water? There are generally two sources of water — ground (underground) and surface (reservoirs, lakes, rivers, etc.), and it’s about a 50-50 split. Larger cities typically use surface water, whereas smaller municipalities use ground. Also, according to James M. Symons, Sc.D., aka Dr. Water, about 80 million people in the United States use water from individual sources (e.g., well water), which is not regulated. Is tap water safe? To state

Fad Food Scares: Myth or Reality?

Public Health & Policy
You’ve heard the catch phrases such as mad cow #disease, bird flu, and E. coli. Whether you flew into a panic or dismissed the media frenzy with a wave of your hand — how much do you really know about these food-industry #health scares? According to Mary McCarthy, Ph.D., a researcher in the department of food business and development at University College Cork, Ireland, people tend to be influenced by emotion more than fact. “From the public perspective, hazards we can control tend to be viewed as less risky than those we can’t. Also, the less the public knows about the production process, the more risk it tends to attribute to a food product. In other words, a familiar hazard is viewed differently from an unfamiliar

Food Concerns That Matter

Public Health & Policy
There are many #fad food scares out there; some, however, are more valid (and scary) than others. Here’s the rundown on a few that experts think we should be concerned about. #Food-Borne Illness (Escherichia coli O157:H7 and salmonella) What it is: Food poisoning is the result of eating organisms or toxins, such as the bacteria E. coli and salmonella, both of which are found in contaminated foods. Symptoms, including nausea and vomiting, abdominal cramps and diarrhea (sometimes bloody), fever and chills, weakness and headache, usually begin two to six hours after eating, although they can begin sooner or much later — in some cases as long as a few days later. E. coli is naturally found in the intestinal tract of animals. Fecal co